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dc.contributor.advisorMichele A. Carter, Ph.D.en_US
dc.creatorToni J. D'Agostinoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-20T16:05:06Z
dc.date.available2008-06-17en_US
dc.date.available2011-12-20T16:05:06Z
dc.date.created2007-07-26en_US
dc.date.issued2007-07-27en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-07262007-170345en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152.3/191
dc.description.abstractCurrently, research with human subjects is going through a period of tremendous upheavals. In many cases these upheavals have created a variety of unmet expectations and have given rise to the perception that trust in the research enterprise is eroding. Trust is vital to the responsible conduct of research and without it many believe that the entire system of research with humans will inevitably fail. Inherent in the practice of research with humans is a diverse set of physical, social, and psychological risks, the disclosure of which affects a subject’s understanding and voluntary agreement to participate. Generally, trust asserts that research personnel can be relied upon to act with integrity, discretion, and competence in their relationships with subjects and the public. Trust in the research process is generated through the subject-investigator relationship and is warranted when role-specific obligations such as respecting the rights and welfare of participants are met. Crucial among these obligations is the ethical requirement to respect the autonomy of individual subjects through an ethically competent informed consent process. Using the Jesse Gelsinger case as an illustration, I will argue that when the doctrine of informed consent is inadequately applied not only can research volunteers be unjustly harmed but the foundation of trust is also betrayed.en_US
dc.format.mediumelectronicen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the TDL web site by The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en_US
dc.subjectresearch ethicsen_US
dc.subjectJesse Gelsingeren_US
dc.subjectinformed consenten_US
dc.subjecthuman subject researchen_US
dc.titleFully informed consent: Can public trust be restored and harms avoided?en_US
dc.type.materialtexten_US
dc.type.genrethesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster ofArtsen_US
thesis.degree.levelMasteren_US
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas Medical Branchen_US
thesis.degree.departmentMedical Humanitiesen_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberWayne R. Patterson, Ph.D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCheryl E. Vaiani, Ph.D.en_US


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