Microscope Collection

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The historical microscope collection housed in the Moody Medical Library is considered one of the major collections of its type owned by an academic institution in the United States.

The collection consists of representative samples documenting the development of microscopy from the 18th through the first quarter of the 20th century. The work of more than 30 individual makers or firms is included.

The microscope collection dates from 1967, when the Library acquired 33 microscopes from Dr. John Bunyan (1907-1983) with a grant from the Moody Foundation of Galveston. A past president of the Royal Microscopical Society in London, and a collector, Dr. Bunyan provided additional instruments as well as partial cataloging for the collection in subsequent years. Of the 82 instruments, 60 percent are associated with him. The remaining consists of microscopes from the Departments of Anatomy and Pathology, gifts from former faculty and friends of the University, and a purchase of replica microscopes.

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Now showing 1 - 20 of 57
  • Item
    1.080
    (2012-03-05) Dixey, Charles W.
    Moody Medical Library collection also includes a very similar but an unsigned Gould-type microscope (1.080).
  • Item
    1.051
    (2012-03-05) Spencer Lens Co.
    There is an earlier Spencer instrument in the collection (1.051), with similar features to the above, which may date from about 1920. Signed: Spencer Microscope ALOE Co. Sales Agents No 61515.
  • Item
    1.027
    (2012-03-05) Ross, Andrew.
    The binocular compound microscope has a heavy brass casting that serves as a Y-shaped base and vertical flat pillars. The standard large circular stage is attached to the limb, which is carried on a trunnion. It comes with a wooden carrying case and accessories (eyepieces, objective cases, bull's eye condenser). Signed: Ross, London. 4046.
  • Item
    1.026
    (2012-03-05) Ross, Andrew.
    Very similar to Ross microscope described above, except that it is larger and has a more elaborate stage and condenser fittings. It comes with a carrying case, eye pieces, and one objective lens, with engraving "A. Ross, 1852." Signed: A. Ross London 529.
  • Item
    1.023
    (2012-03-05) Reichert, Carl.
    Moody Medical Library has two other microscopes by C. Reichert: A compound microscope (1.023), similar to (1.047), except with a double nosepiece and a rotating stage, and signed, "C. Reichert Wien 64650" Both (1.022 ) and (1.023) date from the early part of the 20th century.
  • Item
    1.022
    (2012-03-05) Reichert, Carl.
    A smaller student microscope (1.022) with a horseshoe-shaped foot, tubular pillar that supports the tube and the stage, and signed, "C. Reichert Wien No 45247." Dates from the early part of the 20th century.
  • Item
    1.075
    (2012-03-05) Leitz, Ernst.
    Another Leitz microscope from the 1920s, with serial 290899.
  • Item
    1.066
    (2012-03-05) Leitz, Ernst.
    Another Leitz microscope similar to the above (1.061) with wooden carrying case, about 1896, and signed: E. Leitz Wetzlar & New York No 28744.
  • Item
    1.021
    (2012-03-05) Leitz, Ernst.
    The oldest Leitz instrument in the collection is a small microscope, Stand V. The horseshoe base supports a circular pillar, to which the body-tube, square stage and mirror are attached. There is no substage. Focusing is by sliding the inner tube and adjusting the micrometer screw. Signed: E. Leitz Wetzlar No 6017.
  • Item
    1.045
    (2012-03-05) Bausch & Lomb Optical Co.
    The collection includes two all-brass Continental model microscopes by Bausch & Lomb, which are similar to the above. The instrument (1.044) with serial number 40315, and instrument (1.045), with a serial number 26124, date from the turn of the 20th century.
  • Item
    1.044
    (2012-03-02) Bausch & Lomb Optical Co.
    The collection includes two all-brass Continental model microscopes by Bausch & Lomb, which are similar to the above. The instrument (1.044) with serial number 40315, and instrument (1.045), with a serial number 26124, date from the turn of the 20th century.
  • Item
    1.056
    (2012-02-07) Bryson, Robert.
    This all brass monocular microscope has a bent claw foot, a feature found in James Swift & Son instruments. The stage, attached to the base by trunnions, supports the tubular limb with an arm. The coarse focusing is by the draw-tube, and the fine focusing by the screw on top of the limb. A swinging mirror is attached to the tubular tailpiece. The small instrument was likely intended for use by students. No carrying case and accessories. Signed: Bryson, Edinburgh.
  • Item
    1.034
    (2012-02-07) Zeiss, Carl.
    The instrument sits on a horseshoe base and a slotted rectangular pillar supports the stage and tubular limb. Below the stage are a rotating double mirror, a swinging platform for the iris diaphragm (which moves on the platform by rackwork), and an Abbe condenser. The substage moves vertically by rackwork. It comes with a wooden carrying case. Signed C. Zeiss Jena 19146.
  • Item
    1.071
    (2012-02-07) Spencer Lens Company.
    The horseshoe base and the pillar are cast as one piece. The curved limb is attached to the base by means of trunnions. Below the square stage are the Abbe condenser, iris diaphragm, and a mirror. The body-tube with a triple nosepiece moves by rackwork, and the fine focusing is by a micrometer screw. No case and accessories. Signed: Spencer Buffalo U.S.A. 206665.
  • Item
    1.076
    (2012-02-07) Verick, Constant.
  • Item
    1.014
    (2012-02-07) Powell & Lealand.
    The instrument, referred to as "Student's Compound Microscope" in Powell & Lealand catalogs, has a cast-iron foot and limb, painted black. It is also called the "iron" microscope. The limb supports the stage and the body-tube. The rack-and-pinion drive is located internally and operated by a brass knob. Signed: Powell & Lealand, London.
  • Item
    1.052
    (2012-02-07) Bausch & Lomb Optical Co.
    The horseshoe base and the pillar, cast as one piece, and the limb are made of iron and painted black. The brass arm supports the body-tube, which has a triple nosepiece. The coarse adjustment is by rackwork, and the screw for fine adjusting is on top of the limb. Below the square stage are a swinging Abbe condenser, an iris diaphragm, and a double mirror. The microscope was purchased in 1914 by George Hermann III, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, when he was a medical student. It comes with a wooden carrying case and accessories. Signed: Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. Rochester, N.Y. The serial number 99168 is at the end of the tube.
  • Item
    1.030
    (2012-02-07) Ross, Andrew.
    The binocular compound microscope is a variation on the Ross- Zentmayer instrument described above (Ross 5062). It features an A-shaped, tripod foot which supports the double pillars. The limb, attached to the pillars by trunnions, carries the rest of the parts of the microscope, with a rotating stage. It comes with a wooden case and accessories. Signed: Ross-5277. London
  • Item
    1.041
    (2012-02-07) Cuff, John.
    This unsigned, Cuff-type microscope is attributed to Tiedemann of Stuttgart. The instrument is attached to the box-foot by a beveled rectangular brass base. The curved pillar supports the limb, to which are attached the body-tube and the spring stage. Focusing is by the screw at the top of the limb. Accessories include objective lenses, ivory sliders, and stage forceps. For other Cuff-type instruments in the collection, see George Adams and Henry Shuttleworth.
  • Item
    1.033
    (2012-02-07) Zeiss, Carl.
    This is the latest Zeiss microscope in the collection and dates from about 1908. It has many features in common with the earlier Zeiss instrument (1.034) below. Additionally, it includes the "jug handle," an elaborate stage mechanism with the Berger micrometer, and a triple nosepiece. The body-tube moves by rackwork. Signed: Carl Zeiss Jena Nr. 46860.