HIGH TRAIT MOTOR IMPULSIVITY IS AN ANTECEDENT TO COCAINE-SEEKING BUT NOT OXYCODONE-SEEKING BEHAVIOR IN RODENTS

Abstract

Relapse is a dynamic and essential barrier to abstinence in substance use disorders with behavioral endophenotypes (e.g. impulsivity) and exposure to environmental drug-associated cues along with complex neurobiology as precipitating factors. Impulsivity is expressed in different forms (e.g. motor impulsivity, impulsive choice) and is associated with both cocaine use disorder and opioid use disorder. Animal models of motor impulsivity and relapse vulnerability can be reasonably matched to provide valid translational approaches to help determine whether motor impulsivity is a factor leading to (i.e., trait) and/or resulting from abstinence from (i.e., state) drug use and relapse. We tested the hypotheses that abstinence from cocaine and oxycodone would have differential effects on trait motor impulsivity and drug-seeking behavior. We demonstrate that oxycodone- but not cocaine-abstinence altered trait motor impulsivity phenotypes. Additionally, motor impulsivity phenotypes predicted cocaine but not oxycodone drug-seeking. The findings presented here offer a glimpse into the complex relationship between trait and state motor impulsivity and drug-seeking behaviors during abstinence across classes of drugs of abuse.

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Keywords
Cocaine, oxycodone, motor impulsivity, relapse, self-administration, 1-CSRT task, opioids, trait, state
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